Christmas Hours and Waste Collection

The City of Kwinana would like to advise that changes will occur to City Administration hours and Community Centres over the Christmas and New Year period. To view a full list of closures, visit > https://kwin.city/3VcsrL1

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Pools, Spas and Safety Barriers

Pools, spas and safety barriers

A building permit is required for all swimming pools, outdoor spas and barriers, according to the Building Act 2011. This includes temporary, inflatable and/or portable above-ground pools.

For more information, see Are you installing a swimming pool or outside spa?

Pool inspection program

The City will carry out a mandatory inspection prior to approving a swimming pool and barrier application. This inspection is free of charge and is to consider the proposal in the environment where it will be installed to eliminate non-compliant barriers. 

On receipt of a swimming pool barrier application, the City will contact the applicant and arrange a suitable time to discuss the barrier’s proposed location. The approved permit will be conditioned to contact the City on completion of the pool and barrier installation and arrange for a final inspection. The City will inspect the barrier for compliance with the permit approval and if satisfied issue an inspection certificate.

Mandatory Inspections

Once your completed pool/spa and barrier has been confirmed as compliant by the City, it is the property owner’s responsibility to maintain the barrier in a compliant state until the next inspection.

In accordance with State Government Legislation Building Regulations 2012, the City of Kwinana is required to inspect the safety barriers to private swimming pools and spas periodically, so that no more than four years elapse between inspections. This is to ensure that safety barriers/ fences and other safety features continue to comply with the requirement of the required legislation.

Royal Lifesaving Society WA has been contracted by the City of Kwinana to conduct assessments of all private swimming pool and spa barriers.

To ensure the inspection is undertaken as efficiently as possible, Royal Lifesaving will be contacting property owners to book in a suitable time for one of their inspectors to visit the property.

Your cooperation in promptly arranging an inspection will greatly assist in organising an efficient inspection program.

Please note that if you own a swimming pool and it is registered with the City, the cost for this mandatory inspection are covered by your rates and therefore they can be booked in and carried out at no additional cost to you the property owner. 

If there is a dog on the property, it must be restrained while the inspection is being undertaken by either placing your dog on a lead or in an enclosure preventing their escape. Your co-operation in this matter is appreciated.

The City of Kwinana thanks you as a responsible swimming pool/spa owner in anticipation for your cooperation and support in completing these mandatory swimming pool inspections.

Should you have any questions regarding the inspection process, please call The City’s Building Services on 9439 0263 or email building@kwinana.wa.gov.au

Had enough of your pool? Here are some handy hints to follow:

  • totally remove your pool if it’s above ground; or
  • totally remove your pool and backfill if below ground. You need to obtain a compaction certificate for the backfill; or
  • leave pool in, but make two holes (minimum size of 1m x 1m each) one in the deep end and another in the shallow end of the pool. 

Once you have done one of the above options, contact the City's Building Department on 9439 0208 to arrange an inspection and complete the statutory declaration.​​​

Decommissioning Swimming Pools or Spas

Neither the Building Act 2011 nor the Building Regulations 2012 define or reference the decommissioning of swimming pools and or spas. Both these statutory documents, however, define a swimming pool as that defined in BCA Volume 1 Part A1.

The BCA defines a swimming pool as: any excavation or structure containing water and principally used, or that is designed, manufactured, or adopted to be principally used for swimming, wading, or the like, including a bath or wading pool, or spa. And;
AS1926.1-2012 defines a swimming pool as: any structure containing water to a depth greater than 300mm and used primarily for swimming, wading, paddling or the like, including a bathing or wading pool, or spa pool.

Ideally, when the swimming pool or spa is no longer wanted, they would be removed from site either by deflating, dismantling, excavating, and lifting out, or complete demolition.  Any demolition material removed from site and taken to an approved disposal site. The excavation filled with soil endemic to the site and compacted in layers.

The reality is that many below ground pools get buried, potentially creating future development problems. 

What constitutes decommissioning?

By definition, decommissioning would be removing aspects that make the structure a swimming pool, such as complete removal, remove its ability to contain more than 300mm of water, remove the access, and remove any filtration system. The main consideration is the inability to hold water.

The following are examples of the main types of swimming pools and how best to decommission:

Above Ground Pools

  • Inflatable: deflate and remove
  • Solid sided: Remove liner, ladder, and any filtration system.  Ideally complete dismantling and removal.

Above Ground Pools Installed Below Ground

  1. Minimum requirements, retaining walls and steel frame still in place:
    - Remove liner, ladder, and any filtration system.  Ideally complete dismantling and removal.
    - Remove all the above-ground pool structure and filtration system.
    - Break down the retaining walls to a minimum of 500mm below natural ground level.
    - Remove the demolished material to an approved disposal site.
    - The excavation filled with soil endemic to the site and compacted in layers.
  2. Minimum requirements - bury the retaining walls.
  3. Total removal
  • As per 1) above but the total demolition of the pool structure including the walls and any footings.
  • Filling the excavation with clean fill endemic to the site and compacted in layers

Below Ground Concrete or Fibreglass Pools

Minimum requirements:

  • Cut a minimum of 2 x 500mm x 500mm squares (or 1 x 1000mm x 1000mm square) in the base of the pool (deep end) and remove all the fibreglass or concrete from the pool.  Disconnect the filtration system and any access ladders.

Burying the Pool

  • Cut a minimum of 2 x 500mm x 500mm squares (or 1 x 1000mm x 1000mm square) in the base of the pool (deep end) and remove all the fibreglass or concrete from the pool.  Disconnect the filtration system and any access ladders.
  • Cut down the walls of the pool at least 500mm from the top. 
  • Remove the demolished material to an approved disposal site.
  • The excavation filled with soil endemic to the site and compacted in layers.

Complete Removal of the Pool

  • If the pool is in excess of 40m2 in area an Application for a Demolition Permit may be required.
  • Excavate and lift out fibreglass pools whenever possible.
  • Demolish and remove the demolished material from the excavation to an approved disposal site.
  • The excavation filled with soil endemic to the site and compacted in layers.

Application process

To apply for a pool, spa or pool barrier building permit, please see Building and Development.

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